The Mouse's Promise to the Lion

As a mouse ran over a sleeping lion, the lion awoke and grabbed him.
"Let me go, please!" squeaked the mouse. "I'll repay your kindness, I promise!"
"What could you ever do for me?" scoffed the lion. "I'm letting you go only because it's not worth my time to kill you."
A few days later, the lion was caught in a hunter's snare. He roared in terror, and the little mouse ran to the rescue, gnawing through the ropes and freeing the lion.
"I was wrong about you," said the grateful lion. "You're a good friend to have after all."


Inspired byMille Fabulae et Una, a collection of Latin fables that I've edited, free to read online. I am not translating the Latin here; instead, I am just telling a 100-word version of the fable.
Notes: This is fable 208 in the book, which is Perry 150.



The Miller's Cat and the Mice

There was a mill infested with mice, so the miller got a cat to kill the mice. The cat was ferocious and soon there were only a few mice still left alive.
The surviving mice, seeing slaughter all around them, retreated to the highest hiding places they could find, never coming down where the cat lurked.
The cat decided to play dead, lying motionless on the floor.
"Look! The cat is dead!" squeaked the mice.
But the oldest and wisest of the mice warned them, "Don't let that cat fool you! You can't ever trust a cat, living or dead."


Inspired byMille Fabulae et Una, a collection of Latin fables that I've edited, free to read online. I am not translating the Latin here; instead, I am just telling a 100-word version of the fable.
Notes: This is fable 203 in the book, which is Perry 79. In other versions of the story, the cat is hanging up instead of lying on the floor.

The Mouse in the Beer

A mouse had fallen into a pot of beer.
"Help!" he squeaked. "I'm drowning!"
"What will you give me if I pull you out?" asked the cat.
"Anything you want!" shrieked the mouse.
"Promise that you'll come when I call," said the cat.
"I promise!" said the mouse.
So the cat rescued the mouse.
A few days later, the cat was hungry, so he went to the mouse-hole and said, "Come out now, mouse! You promised!"
"That promise doesn't count!" replied the mouse.
"What do you mean?" said the cat.
"I was drunk at the time," replied the mouse, laughing.


Inspired byMille Fabulae et Una, a collection of Latin fables that I've edited, free to read online. I am not translating the Latin here; instead, I am just telling a 100-word version of the fable.
Notes: This is fable 202 in the book, which is Perry 615; the story is from Odo of Cheriton.


The Mouse in the Soup

There was a big pot of soup in the kitchen, and the cook had left the lid off.
A mouse smelled the soup: it was irresistible! So the mouse climbed up onto the pot, and then he jumped in.
As he splashed about in the broth, he gobbled the soup greedily. It was delicious!
Realizing he had no means of escape, the mouse said, "So be it! I've eaten well, my stomach is full, and I'm ready to die."
Having spoken his last words, the mouse disappeared into the depths of the soup.
Such is the end of all gluttons.


Inspired byMille Fabulae et Una, a collection of Latin fables that I've edited, free to read online. I am not translating the Latin here; instead, I am just telling a 100-word version of the fable.
Notes: This is fable 201 in the book, which is Perry 167.


The Mouse in the Chest

There was a mouse who had been born inside a chest, and he lived all his life there, eating the grain inside the chest.
Then one day he climbed up onto the edge of the chest and from there he fell down onto a shelf which was full of bread and cheese and all kinds of wonderful food.
"What a fool I've been," said the mouse, "thinking all this time that there was nothing better in the world than the little chest in which I lived. Now I see the world is full of things I never dreamed of before."


Inspired byMille Fabulae et Una, a collection of Latin fables that I've edited, free to read online. I am not translating the Latin here; instead, I am just telling a 100-word version of the fable.
Notes: This is fable 200 in the book, which is not in Perry's catalog; it is one of the fables of Abstemius.


The Mouse and the Bull

A mighty bull was stretched out comfortably on a bed of straw inside his stable.
Meanwhile, there was a tiny mouse in the straw, and as the mouse nibbled on the straw, he also nibbled on the bull's leg.
"Who did that?" roared the bull. He shook his head angrily, gesturing with his horns, and he finally sprang to his feet, stamping and snorting, looking everywhere for the enemy that had wounded him.
The mouse scurried into his mouse-hole, laughing to himself. "Who would have thought a little guy like me could win a fight with someone so much bigger!"


Inspired byMille Fabulae et Una, a collection of Latin fables that I've edited, free to read online. I am not translating the Latin here; instead, I am just telling a 100-word version of the fable.
Notes: This is fable 199 in the book, which is Perry 353.



The War Between the Mouse and the Frog

The mouse hated the frog, and the frog hated the mouse. So it was that war broke out between them.
"I shall rule the swamp," declared the mouse.
"Never!" replied the frog. "This swamp is mine!"
The mouse attacked, ambushing the frog in the grass, but the frog fought back bravely. They each wielded swords made from the reeds of the marsh.
As the battle dragged on, a hawk saw what was happening and swooped down, catching both frog and mouse unawares, gobbling first one and then the other.
Thus ended the war between the frog and the mouse.


Inspired byMille Fabulae et Una, a collection of Latin fables that I've edited, free to read online. I am not translating the Latin here; instead, I am just telling a 100-word version of the fable.
Notes: This is fable 198 in the book, which is Perry 384.